Power Runs: Key Workouts to Start Understanding Your Power Meter

Garmin has just released its first power meter for running. 

Combined with the just-released, power-compatible version of Garmin Connect IQ, Garmin’s new Running Dynamics Pod ($69) can turn compatible Garmin watches into basic power meters.

Training and racing with a running power meter is different from running with GPS pace, and it takes a little mind bending to get used to this new way of doing things.

Try out some power workouts inspired by Jim Vance’s new guide, RUN WITH POWER, to get to know your new running power meter and start to see how power can make you a stronger, faster, and more durable runner.

Here are some workouts we’ve designed to help illustrate how running pace and power are different. New power meter owners might want to try a few of these to get used to thinking in watts instead of in minutes per mile. Or you can use these exercises to get a feel for your training trifecta of power, pace, and RPE.

[Related: Running with power vs. running with pace.]

Hill Repeats with Pace and Power: Find a course that’s flat, then has a hill, then returns to the flat. Run the hill at a constant pace. What you’ll notice: You’ll work really hard while ascending to maintain the pace. Then you’ll feel like you’re descending really easily at the same pace. Is pace telling the truth about how hard you’re working? No; pace makes it look like running up the hill and down the hill are equally hard. Now try it with power: Run the hill at a constant power number. What you’ll notice: You’ll have to slow way down to avoid overshooting your target power on the ascent. You’ll have to fly back down the hill to hit your power number.  Did the efforts feel the same? Which felt easier or harder? Were you surprised at the difference?

Constant Power Run: Do your 3/9 test to set your running power zones. Then find a course with rolling hills or some variable terrain. Run 45 minutes in Zone 2 while trying to maintain a specific power number in that zone. What you’ll notice: It’s difficult to maintain a constant power on variable terrain and you might find that your rating of perceived exertion (RPE) is much less reliable than you think. Your pace will swing wildly over the varying terrain as you learn to pace by power instead of by pace. You’ll have to run much faster downhill and much slower uphill than you might expect. In fact, you might not be able to hit your target power on the downhill. Very lightweight runners have narrower power zones and might have a harder time staying close to their target power number. The run is likely to feel harder than you’d expect because although the ascents were easier, the overall effort was much more consistent. (After all, maintaining a constant power output makes this a tempo run in zone 2.)

Envelope Runs: This workout makes regular appearances in the training plans designed by Jim Vance in his guide Run with Power. Envelope runs will illuminate the efficiency or energy waste clearly and on any terrain. Run easy in Zone 1-2 for 10-15 minutes, then build to a moderate speed on the edge of comfort/discomfort. Look at your power number or power zone, likely Zone 3-4. Stay in that zone, but find a way to go faster. Push the envelope! Try to be quicker without raising your watts. It’s a balance of trying to hold or increase speed with technique. Focus on your rhythm, cadence, forward lean, soft foot strike, relaxation, eye and head position, even breathing. Finish the run with 10 minutes in Zone 1-2.

Race Pace Intervals: Warm up and then run 3 x 1 mile intervals at your 5K race pace with 2 minutes recovery between each. Or 3 x 2 mile intervals at 10K race pace with 2 minute recoveries. Or similar intervals for half-marathon or marathon. You’ll likely be hurting during the run, so focus on maintaining race pace and running even intervals. After your workout, take a look at your power data: Does it go up for the whole workout? Just at the ends of each interval? Does vertical oscillation go up or down? What stays the same? Now take a look at some recent races at those same distances. How does your power trend and how does this compare against your interval workouts?

Fartlek Peak: No, it’s not a mountain! Do a fartlek run. Use a power meter analysis software that shows can show 30-second Peak Power. What was your 30-second Peak Power for the run? In a few more weeks, do another Fartlek Peak run and compare your 30-second Peak Power. Has it changed?

Cold Start: Skip any usual warm-up and start an endurance/base run in zone 2. What you’ll notice: If you normally do a warm-up before your runs, you’ll probably feel awful for the early part of the run. Your power numbers might seem high. As your heart, muscles, tendons, and joints warm up, you should expect to begin running more smoothly and comfortably, and your power numbers should fall to a more normal zone 2 range, perhaps by as much as 10-20 watts.

Scratch the Surface: Find a sidewalk or paved bike path that is bordered with grass. Run 45 minutes at a constant pace while alternating 5 minutes on the path and 5 minutes on the grass. Note what effect this has on your running form and power, if any.

Sandbagging: Find a stretch of sand, whether it’s a playground sandbox, a beachfront pedestrian path, or a sand volleyball court. Start running toward the sand at a constant pace from a few hundred yards and try to maintain pace as you hit the sand. Note what happens to your power numbers and RPE.

Dreadmill Form Ladders: Hit a gym and head for the treadmill. Tape your watch to the treadmill so you can see it clearly and fire it up. Start at an easy jog pace. Every 5 minutes, speed up the pace by 30 seconds per mile until you reach 5K race pace. Taking care not to misstep or fall off the treadmill, just observe what happens to your power numbers. Now return to easy jog pace. In 5 minutes, speed up the pace by 30 seconds but try to keep your power number as low as possible. Once you’ve achieved the lowest possible power at this pace, note what it feels like. Then repeat. This is an excellent way to drill your muscle memory for more efficient running form.

Trail Running Is Hard: This exercise is a little risky if you don’t run on trails regularly, so be careful and don’t risk a sprained ankle or a fall before any key workouts or races. Run 30-45 minutes (or not so long that you get sloppy with running form) at Zone 2. Try to run at a constant power number on a trail. What you’ll notice: Trail running is hard! Depending on how practiced you are at running on trails, you might feel as if every step requires more effort to stabilize your feet, knees, hips, torso, and arms. You might see this extra effort in your power numbers, which may read much higher than usual, even at slower-than-road paces. It will be difficult to maintain a power number as you jostle around obstacles and negotiate the trail. If you are monitoring your Efficiency Index on a computer, you’ll notice it suffer as your pace slows and your power rises. Trail running might make a good drill for improving efficiency. If you can learn to run smoothly and at a consistent power on trails, think how smoothly you’ll be able to run on the road.

Kite Runner: On a windy day, get stoked for some threshold intervals. Run straight into the wind (if possible) at 10K race pace for 10 minutes, maintaining a constant pace. Note your average power output. Then turn around and immediately run with the wind while maintaining the same pace as before back to your starting point. Did anything change? You might see a higher power number running into the wind and lower with the wind. Now try it with power: Note your starting point, then run into the wind at the top end of Zone 3 for 10 minutes. Then turn around and run with the wind at the top end of Zone 3 for 10 minutes. Your return trip might be faster and you may overshoot your starting point. The difference is the effect of the wind. Though you put out the same power on both intervals, you had to speed up your return trip to hit the same power number.

Have you had a “power meter epiphany” on a run? Have you discovered a workout or drill that shows how running with power is different from running with pace? Please share it with us at dtrendler@competitorgroup.com!

Run with Power by Jim VanceRUN WITH POWER is the groundbreaking guide you need to tap the true potential of your running power meter like SHFTStryd, or RPM2. From 5K to ultramarathon, a power meter can make you faster—but only if you know how to use it. Just viewing your numbers is not enough; you can only become a faster, stronger, more efficient runner when you know what your key numbers mean for your workouts, races, and your season-long training. In Run with Power, TrainingBible coach Jim Vance offers the comprehensive guide you need to find the speed you want.

Run with Power is available now from your local bookstore, tri or running shop, and from these online retailers:
Coach Jim Vance
VeloPress
Limited offers: Get Run with Power FREE with purchase of a SHFT, RPM2, or Stryd power meter while supplies last.

Also available wherever books are sold:
Amazon
Barnes & Noble
local bookstores
Chapters/Indigo

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Analysis of Real-World Marathon Power Data from a Top 10 New York City Marathon Finisher

Adapted with written permission of Competitor.com from the article “Understanding a Marathoner’s Running Power via Stryd Data”.

Patrick Smyth is an elite American marathoner who placed 10th in the New York City Marathon on Nov. 6, 2016 with a finish time of 2:16:34. During the race, he wore a Stryd power meter foot pod which provided data that measured his power, pacing, and fatigue.

In this article, Smyth’s coach Ryan Bolton—the founder and head coach of Bolton Endurance Sports Training (B.E.S.T.) and The Harambee Project elite training group in Santa Fe, N.M.—offers his analysis of Smyth’s power data.

Patrick Smyth NYC Marathon Running Power Dashboard

Patrick Smyth’s Power Data

Pace (blue), Power (yellow), and Elevation (purple) are shown above in Stryd’s analytic platform Power Center. Overall, Smyth ran a very steady pace and tried to avoid the mass accelerations that are often seen on New York’s rolling course profile, especially from miles 16-19.

Patrick Smyth NYC Marathon Running Power Dashboard

Time in Power Zones

The chart above shows how much time Smyth spend at different power ranges as measured in watts. Nearly all of Smyth’s race was between 280 and 350 watts.

Smyth’s average power for the entire race was 306.58 watts. The first half average was 319 watts, which is 8% higher than the second half average of 294 watts. Total Power is a measure of how intensely he races. In the Stryd file, the most notable drops in total power came early in the race on the downhill section of the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge (4:50 through 10:20) and then later on the downhill of the Queensboro Bridge (1:17:10 through 1:21). The first drop in power was caused both by a slowing of his pace and because the downhill required less power to maintain the pace. The drop in power on the Queensboro Bridge came only from the easier downhill running; his pace was steady.

This suggests that Smyth could have run both sections faster and maintained power with not much more additional effort.

As will be seen in the next image, Smyth’s Form Power actually increased during both of those sections due to the increase in the downward force and his less efficient running form on these sections. (He might consider some downhill running form drills to improve his technique and efficiency.)

As the race progressed—particularly from 1:20 and later—Smyth’s power decreased in direct proportion to a decrease in running pace. This is expected since running slower on flat terrain requires less energy.

If Smyth has increased his pace in the second half of the race, his total power would have actually increased as the race wore on.

Patrick Smyth NYC Marathon Form Power and Total Power

Form Power in Relation to Total Power

 Less efficient runners have a higher Form Power and a higher ratio of Form Power to Total Power. Basically, as run form falls apart, your Form Power rises. Smyth has a very efficient running technique, so his Form Power numbers are relatively good, as you can see in the chart above. His average Form Power was 65 watts, but it rose 2.2% throughout the race; Smyth got less efficient as he fatigued. For amateurs, this increase will be much higher. What we see in Smyth’s power data is that he did slow slightly in the second half of the race, yet he also didn’t let his form fall apart.

It’s most useful to express Form Power as a fraction of Total Power. In the early parts of the race, Smyth is efficient and his Form Power is about 20% of Total Power. As he fatigues, his Form Power nears 30% of Total Power, which shows a decrease in efficiency in the second half of the race.

Patrick Smyth NYC Marathon Ground Time Vertical Oscillation

Vertical Oscillation

Vertical oscillation is a measurement of how much an athlete bounces vertically while running. Normal values range from 8-14 cm. Smyth’s average was 8.1 cm during the marathon, which means he’s a smooth runner who doesn’t bounce much. Being this efficient as a marathoner is very helpful. Some oscillation is, of course, a necessary part of running. Vertical oscillation over 15 cm is too much bouncing and under 7 cm is not good, either.

Ground time measures how long the foot is in contact with the ground from foot strike to toe off. Typical values range from 150 to 300 milliseconds. This number varies with running speed and also running efficiency. Shorter ground contact times are associated with a more efficient running stride and the energy savings can really add up over the course of a marathon or half-marathon.

Take a look at the chart above and you’ll see air time (yellow), ground time (orange), and both (blue). What typically happens with more fatigue is that ground time goes up while air time goes down.

Watching the yellow and orange lines diverge is a great indicator of the levels of fatigue in most runners. Smyth’s average ground time  for the race was 175 ms, which is at the low and more efficient end of the range—just what we’d expect from a runner of his high caliber. As the race wore on, Smyth’s ground time increased with fatigue. Yet his longest ground time was about 240 ms, which is still well within the normal ranges. Smyth is an efficient runner! His ground time rose 8.4 % during the second half and this is likely due mostly to the decreasing speeds and pace of the race.

Patrick Smyth NYC Marathon Running Power Chart

Power Data Comparison

 Without knowing Smyth’s race finish time, a lot can be concluded from looking at this chart above.

  • Power fell during the race, mostly because the race slowed down.
  • Form Power was consistent, showing that Smyth maintained his running form despite fatigue.
  • Ground Time rose during the race. A normal range is 150-300 ms. Smyth’s race was well within the normal range, despite fatigue, which reveals that he is an efficient runner with good endurance that helps him maintain form throughout a race.
  • Leg Stiffness is a measure of how much energy a runner can recycle with each stride. Higher Leg Stiffness is generally better than lower Leg Stiffness. Smyth’s Leg Stiffness fell during the race, revealing fatigue.
  • His Cadence fell slightly from 184 steps per minute to 181.5 spm. A normal range is 180-200 spm.
  • Smyth’s Vertical Oscillation fell slightly during the race, meaning he became less bouncy. A normal range is 8-14 cm and Smyth was on the more efficient end around 8 cm.
  • His pace rose from 4:57 minutes per mile to 5:30 pace, an 10% decrease in speed. In this case, the overall race pace slowed.

The Big Question

 How can we use Smyth’s data to guide his training and racing going forward?

The most notable change in the data is what happened to his form during the second half of the race, especially from mile 16-26. His Form Power increased and rose in relation to his Total Power, which indicates a loss of efficiency. His Leg Stiffness, Ground Time, and Vertical Oscillation values agree with this assessment. The good news is that all these parameters are related. When we work on one, we can improve the others.

We can use Stryd data from future workouts to see if Smyth is improving. One key way that Smyth might improve is to monitor Ground Time in real time on his watch. Thinking about having “quick feet” should lower ground time and also improve Leg Stiffness and Vertical Oscillation.

He might consider attacking the downhills of future races since upping the pace during a downhill is relatively easy. He might also add some downhill running form drills to smooth out his stride on downhill sections.

Find out your own key power numbers in Jim Vance’s complete guide, RUN WITH POWER.

Run with Power by Jim Vance

RUN WITH POWER is the groundbreaking guide you need to tap the true potential of your running power meter like SHFTStryd, or RPM2. From 5K to ultramarathon, a power meter can make you faster—but only if you know how to use it. Just viewing your numbers is not enough; you can only become a faster, stronger, more efficient runner when you know what your key numbers mean for your workouts, races, and your season-long training. In Run with Power, TrainingBible coach Jim Vance offers the comprehensive guide you need to find the speed you want.

Run with Power is available now from your local bookstore, tri or running shop, and from these online retailers:
Coach Jim Vance
VeloPress
Limited offers: Get Run with Power FREE with purchase of a SHFT, RPM2, or Stryd power meter while supplies last.

Also available wherever books are sold:
Amazon
Barnes & Noble
local bookstores
Chapters/Indigo

Your Tempo Run Using Pace Is Not Really a Tempo Run

By Dave Trendler, VeloPress

On my first run after setting my power zones using Jim Vance’s method, I noticed something puzzling: the easy run was much harder than I was expecting it to be.

My workout was an endurance run: Run 40 minutes in Zone 2 with three 1-minute walk breaks. I decided to try to run at a constant power number (the very top of Zone 2) for the whole run, which meant that I had to run up hills much slower than normal, run the flats faster than I was expecting, and then run really hard on every downhill. My pace varied wildly as I responded to the terrain.

By the time I got back home, I felt as if I’d run a zone 3 tempo run instead of a zone 2 endurance run. I’ve run the same route several times before, attacking the hills at a much faster pace than this run, but this time the workout was much harder than usual. Why? Running with power leaves nowhere to hide.

That’s when I realized how a power meter can make training so much more precise. Let’s look at a marathon training tempo run as an example of what I mean.

Pretend you’re training for a marathon and the training plan you are using says that today’s workout is a tempo run: 2 x 5 miles at goal marathon pace.

Since your training plan was developed by a coach who has a solid understanding of exercise physiology, your coach has designed this workout to cause specific changes in your body that will help you meet your marathon goal. A tempo run, for example, builds endurance at race pace and also helps you internalize your race pace so you can run at a consistent pace on race day. As the Hansons say in their best-selling high-performance training program, Hansons Marathon Method, “the intensity of a tempo run is just fast enough that the aerobic system is challenged to keep up with a high percentage of fat oxidation, but it’s slow enough that the mitochondria and supporting fibers can barely keep up.”

Now let’s throw some real life into your workout: Let’s assume it’s tough in your area to find a 10-mile training ground that’s flat and that you’ll encounter some rolling hills or varying terrain during today’s tempo run.

You start your workout on flat terrain and have no trouble maintaining your goal marathon pace. Then a hill looms ahead. You stick to your workout plan and feel your glutes and calves tighten as you maintain goal marathon pace while ascending the short hill. At the top, your body returns to normal as you stick to your goal pace. Then heading back down the hill, you start breathing easily and your heart rate falls since it’s easy to maintain your goal marathon pace as you coast down the hill.

The next few miles go similarly with smaller hills, gentle inclines, and maybe a few sections where you run on trail between road segments. This is an out-and-back run, so you hit your 5 miles and turn around to do it all again. You get home and feel great that you were able to maintain your marathon goal pace for all 10 miles.

Sounds like a typical day training for a marathon, right?

But what kind of workout did you actually do? Was it truly a tempo run?

Consider this: In maintaining your goal marathon pace while running uphill, you raised your exercise intensity much higher than intended. As the Hansons say, “the intensity of a tempo run is just fast enough that the aerobic system is challenged to keep up with a high percentage of fat oxidation, but it’s slow enough that the mitochondria and supporting fibers can barely keep up.” Since running hills is much harder than running on the flat, every uphill section of today’s workout was way off your coach’s intended workout intensity.

And what about the downhill sections? Same thing. It’s much easier to run downhill, so by maintaining your goal marathon pace on the downhill, you were running way too easy.

Doesn’t it all even out? No, it doesn’t. 

It’s true that you get to keep all the fitness you gain from all the time you spend in any specific training zone. But when your workout intensity varies, the benefits you reap vary, too, and you might not earn the physical changes that you or your coach intended to gain from the workout.

Exercise physiologists tell us that the body changes in specific ways in response to the time we spend at specific exercise intensities. Each exercise intensity – or zone – causes different and specific changes in our bodies. Your coach knows this and designs your training plans to include easy days (zone 1), endurance or base run days (zone 2), tempo runs (zone 3), aerobic threshold runs or intervals (zone 4), strength runs (zone 5), hill repeats or fast intervals (zone 6), and short sprints or striders (zone 7). Smart workouts that target these zones are the most effective ways to train because they cause specific changes that prepare you for the demands of your race.

So instead of running 2 x 5 miles in zone 3, which builds endurance at race pace and challenges your aerobic system and mitochondria, you might have spent 70% of your run in the right zone and 30% of  your run in other zones and causing other changes.

Let’s try this same workout with a power meter. Translating this workout from pace to power might look like this: Run 90 minutes in zone 3.

You’d put on your power meter and start your run. Since you’ve already done the power test and know your power zones, you’d know that zone 3 for you is a range between 165 watts and 177 watts (for example). All you have to do is run within that power zone for 90 minutes. It’s that simple. In order to maintain your goal power number, you’ll need to slow down while running up hills and speed up while running down them. You’ll spend all 90 minutes at exactly the correct exercise intensity. You’ll come home and know that you did the workout correctly—and your coach will be happy. Your workout was laser focused in the right zone, causing the right changes in your body that your coach wants to see.

As you’re enjoying a post-run recovery snack, you might look back on your workout and think it was harder than you’d expected, which is just what happened to me on my first-ever power-based run. Why? Because you just ran the entire 90 minutes at the same, consistent effort level.

Pace ignores terrain, so if your workout calls for running at a constant pace, then you must adjust your effort to keep your pace the same. That means your effort is all over the place, which means you might train in several zones instead of the one your coach wanted you in. If you maintain your target pace while running up a hill, you’ll be running much harder than intended. If you maintain your target pace running downhill, your effort will be much easier than your workout calls for. You won’t come even close to doing this workout the right way. This variability in effort means that pace-based workouts are full of little breaks and surges.

Power leaves nowhere to hide or rest. Power gives you the option to run at the same effort regardless of terrain.

It’s possible that your coach might even shorten future power-based workouts. Since power allows you to stay in exactly the right zone for your entire workout, it should take you less time to accumulate the time in zone that all training plans are shooting for because of their corresponding physiological changes. Training with pace, despite its reputation, is a scattershot approach unless you are committed to running on a treadmill, a track, or the same flat course.

RUN WITH POWER is the groundbreaking guide you need to tap the true potential of your running power meter like SHFTStryd, or RPM2. From 5K to ultramarathon, a power meter can make you faster—but only if you know how to use it. Just viewing your numbers is not enough; you can only become a faster, stronger, more efficient runner when you know what your key numbers mean for your workouts, races, and your season-long training. In Run with Power, TrainingBible coach Jim Vance offers the comprehensive guide you need to find the speed you want.

Run with Power by Jim VanceRun with Power is available now from your local bookstore, tri or running shop, and from these online retailers:
Coach Jim Vance
VeloPress
Limited offers: Get Run with Power FREE with purchase of a SHFT, RPM2, or Stryd power meter while supplies last.

Also available wherever books are sold:
Amazon
Barnes & Noble
local bookstores
Chapters/Indigo

How to Use Run Power Data to Pace Ironman Triathlon Marathons

by Jim Vance

Republished from the TrainingPeaks.com article “Perfecting Training for the Ironman Run with Run Power Data” with permission of Jim Vance.

One of the most popular questions among Ironman® triathletes, (and generally the hardest to answer), is “How fast can I run off the bike for the marathon?”

If you’ve ever done an Ironman, you know the marathon pace is much slower than you could run if you were fresh, running an open marathon. But what is that race pace for you off the bike? How can you determine it?

The truth is, you can’t really determine your Ironman marathon race race pace very effectively, because the pace you run off the bike will be greatly determined by the bike intensity and duration, your nutrition and pacing, as well as the course and conditions. All we’ve been able to do as coaches and athletes is train some type of aerobic intensity, and hope that it translates on race day. The problem has been we’ve had to use pace to try and identify intensity, and those don’t match since the pace is slower in the Ironman run but still a hard effort. But by using running power, now you can specifically train for the intensity of the Ironman run, no matter the pace.

Two professional triathletes at Kona, Matt Russell, (12th), and Lionel Sanders, (29th), wore the new Stryd power meter device, a footpod which measures the work rate, in watts, of each athlete while running. (If you’re in need of a refresher on how run power meters work, you can read here.) There are some things which can be learned from these athletes and their power files from the Ironman run.

Matt Russell 2016 Ironman World Championships Marathon Running Power Data

Matt Russell Ironman Kona 2016 Marathon Running Power File

Matt Russell paced himself quite well, in route to a 2:54 marathon. His first half of the race was at an average power of 321 watts, with the second half at 300 watts, The Variability Index of his race was only 1.01, so he ran a well-paced marathon overall.

(Note: since we don’t know Matt’s or Lionel’s functional threshold power for running, the rFTPw, metrics like TSS and IF are not accurate in these files.)

Matt Russell Ironman Kona 2016 Marathon Running Power File

In fact, Russell’s highest 1-hour power doesn’t even begin until about mile 2 of the run, through the top of Palani. That’s good pacing early on. You can see on the downhills, his power drops dramatically, taking advantage of gravity. His uphill efforts are not major surges in wattage, meaning he has run well to get up the hills with minimal energy use.

Lionel Sanders Ironman Kona 2016 Marathon Running Power File

Lionel Sanders 2016 Ironman World Championships Marathon Running Power Data

Lionel Sanders didn’t have the run he is capable of. His first hour was his highest power output. You can see that after the climb up Palani, he really began to struggle. The first hour was 319 watts, but the overall average for the whole run was 270 watts. That’s a 49 watt drop-off, or about 15%. For comparison, Matt’s drop off was less than 4%. The Variability Index of Lionel’s run overall was 1.04, compared to Matt’s 1.01.

Lionel Sanders Ironman Kona 2016 Marathon Running Power File

How to Use Running Power Data to Improve Your Training

So how can athletes use this run power data? Great question! One immediately clear way for athletes to use this is to train more specifically for the Ironman run, and more effectively. Let me explain further.

Much like an athlete can train on a bike with power–using Zone 2 power workouts to build Ironman specific bike fitness–now an athlete can train specifically using run power to build Ironman run fitness, instead of trying to guess at their race intensity using pace or heart rate.

In my new book, Run with Power, I present the key concept of power for running, the speed per watt concept, which I call Efficiency Index, or EI. EI represents how fast you can run for the watts you produce. Much like cycling, we have power zones associated with different intensities and energy systems. The Ironman run is anywhere from Zone 1 to Zone 3 intensity, depending on the speed of the athlete.

For the Ironman run, most athletes would be well served training a lot at their Zone 2 power for running, such as in their long runs. With this type of training, seeing improvements in EI show the athlete that their race specific run fitness is improving. Add heartrate data to this, and athletes can get a very good measurement of their aerobic fitness, based upon the speed per watt at certain heartrates.

For Matt Russell, he ranged mostly between 300 and 320 watts through the race. Long runs at that wattage range, and how well he can maximize the pace of his runs at those watts, can be a huge tool for him to build specific fitness to run well off the bike.

For Lionel, he can probably use this data to determine if the early watts were too strong, comparing the zone he was running in for those early watts, and he could use the power meter to better pace himself in the future, finding the right watts to run at.

Power has the potential to revolutionize run training and performance, much like it has done for cycling, and helping define the specific intensity for the Ironman run, is just one example. If you’re using power for cycling, it’s time to take the next step and run with power.

Jim Vance is the author of Run With Power and Triathlon 2.0, and is an Elite Coach for TrainingBible and SuperFly Coaching. You can learn more from Jim at CoachVance.com.

Run with Power by Jim Vance

RUN WITH POWER is the groundbreaking guide you need to tap the true potential of your running power meter like SHFTStryd, or RPM2. From 5K to ultramarathon, a power meter can make you faster—but only if you know how to use it. Just viewing your numbers is not enough; you can only become a faster, stronger, more efficient runner when you know what your key numbers mean for your workouts, races, and your season-long training. In Run with Power, TrainingBible coach Jim Vance offers the comprehensive guide you need to find the speed you want.

Run with Power is available now from your local bookstore, tri or running shop, and from these online retailers:
Coach Jim Vance
VeloPress
Limited offers: Get Run with Power FREE with purchase of a SHFT, RPM2, or Stryd power meter while supplies last.

Also available wherever books are sold:
Amazon
Barnes & Noble
local bookstores
Chapters/Indigo

Final Surge Partners with Coach Jim Vance and Stryd to Integrate Running Power Metrics and Offer Power-Based Training Plans

Triathlon coach Jim Vance has announced a partnership with Final Surge to provide power-based run training zones and power-based training plans on the Final Surge platform.

Coach Vance is the author of Run with Power, the groundbreaking guide to running with a power meter. Now, in the Final Surge platform, Jim’s power-based training zones are automatically calculated for users upon entering their Running Functional Threshold Power (rFTPw).

The Final Surge platform now also displays data from Stryd power meter devices.  This data includes Running Power, Form Power and Leg Spring Stiffness in addition to Running Dynamic metrics such as Stride Length, Vertical Oscillation and Ground Contact Time.

“Running with power, especially Stryd, is the next breakthrough in the sport of running. This season, I have seen first hand how Ben Kanute, who competed in the 2016 Summer Olympic Games in Rio, benefited from the use of running power in training and racing. At this year’s Ironman 70.3® World Championships, we used live running power data to help guide Kanute’s pacing during the running leg of the race, which helped him run to a second place finish.”

To learn more about the Jim Vance Running with Power training plans, visit: http://www.finalsurge.com/TrainingPlans/JimVance

 

About Final Surge

Final Surge is the training and coaching platform that empowers athletes and coaches to reach fitness and performance excellence like never before. Final Surge has all of the features you need to track and analyze your training, from communicating with coaches and planning future workouts to importing workout and GPS data from your fitness devices, including the Final Surge app on your mobile device.

Final Surge was created by athletes and coaches who are also professional software developers. After using Final Surge, you will agree they completely understand today’s complex and demanding training environment.

RUN WITH POWER is the groundbreaking guide you need to tap the true potential of your running power meter like SHFTStryd, or RPM2. From 5K to ultramarathon, a power meter can make you faster—but only if you know how to use it. Just viewing your numbers is not enough; you can only become a faster, stronger, more efficient runner when you know what your key numbers mean for your workouts, races, and your season-long training. In Run with Power, TrainingBible coach Jim Vance offers the comprehensive guide you need to find the speed you want.

Run with Power by Jim VanceRun with Power is available now from your local bookstore, tri or running shop, and from these online retailers:
Coach Jim Vance
VeloPress
Limited offers: Get Run with Power FREE with purchase of a SHFT, RPM2, or Stryd power meter while supplies last.

Also available wherever books are sold:
Amazon
Barnes & Noble
local bookstores
Chapters/Indigo

Announcing a new power partner: SHFT

RunwithPower.net is pleased to announce a new partnership with SHFT, a manufacturer of a power-based wearable device that is designed to help runners improve their technique and run more efficiently and with fewer injuries.

Beginning this spring while supplies last, runners who purchase a SHFT will receive a free copy of Run with Power: The Complete Guide to Power Meters for Running by Jim Vance.

SHFT power meterFor the past three years, SHFT has been working on creating the world’s most intelligent virtual running coach. SHFT is here to help runners worldwide reduce the risk of injury while improving their running technique and energy consumption. This is done by eliminating unnecessary and inappropriate movements in the running pattern and instead focus on how every body movement can be more efficient, contributing to the maximum propulsion possible.

SHFT’s ambition is to give every runner the possibility to gain access to his or her very own private running coach on a daily basis.
The complex combination of intelligent hardware and sophisticated software represents in its simplicity a unique digital running coach whose sole purpose is to turn you into the best version of yourself.
 
The system consists of two pods – one placed on the chest, the other on the right shoe – that in combination collects your individual running data.

SHFT pod SHFT measures Running Metrics to evaluate and track your development, and to check that you are on target to reach a more efficient running style. SHFT will then real-time coach you depending on your performance across the different Running Metrics.

RUN WITH POWER is the groundbreaking guide you need to tap the true potential of your running power meter like SHFTStryd, or RPM2. From 5K to ultramarathon, a power meter can make you faster—but only if you know how to use it. Just viewing your numbers is not enough; you can only become a faster, stronger, more efficient runner when you know what your key numbers mean for your workouts, races, and your season-long training. In Run with Power, TrainingBible coach Jim Vance offers the comprehensive guide you need to find the speed you want.

Run with Power by Jim VanceRun with Power is available now from your local bookstore, tri or running shop, and from these online retailers:
Coach Jim Vance
VeloPress
Limited offers: Get Run with Power FREE with purchase of a SHFT, RPM2, or Stryd power meter while supplies last.

Also available wherever books are sold:
Amazon
Barnes & Noble
local bookstores
Chapters/Indigo

 

Run with Power Expert Panel Video Index

Stryd, VeloPress, and Sansego assembled a panel of power meter experts during the Ironman World Championships to discuss the state of the art in using power meters for running and triathlon.

VeloPress has made videos of the full discussion as well as several segments available on its YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/velopress.

If these videos interest you, please purchase Jim Vance’s new book RUN WITH POWER: The Complete Guide to Power Meters for Running which offers the first exploration of how runners and triathletes can use this new technology. If you are looking for a power-savvy coach, try Jim Vance at TrainingBible Coaching or Frank Jakobsen at Sansego. If you are considering purchasing a power meter, please visit our partners Stryd and RPM2.

The expert panelists in the videos include:

* Dr. Andrew Coggan, exercise physiologist and pioneering researcher in the use of power meters
* Jim Vance, TrainingBible coach and author of the book RUN WITH POWER: The Complete Guide to Power Meters for Running
* Craig “Crowie” Alexander, 3-time Ironman World Champion and founder of Sansego coaching
* Frank Jakobsen, Sansego coach
* Jamie Williamson, co-founder of Stryd, the first wearable power meter for running

VIDEO INDEX

Running Power Meter Expert Panel FULL VIDEO (43:49 minutes)
Movement Begins in the Head (3:04)
Getting Intensity Right (4:36)
Brick & Envelope Runs (2:50)
Collect Run Power Data Now or Fall Behind (3:23)
Athlete Self-Tests & Workouts (3:29)

Full playlist of all six videos.

The video of the full 45-minute panel discussion was led by Bob Babbitt and covered these topics:

* The benefits of using a power meter for running and triathlon
* The difficulties to overcome in creating a running power meter
* The major difference between cycling power and running power
* How running power meters can help you develop more than one running technique to use at different speeds
* How power meters for running are like a portable biomechanics laboratory
* Power meters can be a training diagnostic tool, especially for long runs
* How the running power meter lets runners train at the correct intensity
* Power meters improve Training Stress Scores
* Stryd can see the difference in training stress between running on treadmills and running on pavement.
* How specialized brick workouts can zero in on your best running form off the bike
* Envelope runs, a new way to train for more efficient run form
* What’s coming soon from Stryd
* How power meters will revolutionize pacing on hilly courses and race pacing
* Why runners should adopt power as soon as possible instead of waiting for the technology to mature
* Which parts of the book RUN WITH POWER have been most helpful to readers
* Self-tests and new running form and techniques to try
* How a power meter is a useful tool even for runners who prefer to run by feel
* How coaches can use a power meter to identify strengths and weaknesses in their athletes
* How a power meter can help you find the best running shoes for you
* Why power meters become more valuable as courses or conditions become more difficult
* How Stryd is using data mining of user data
* Where Stryd is headed to help runners improve efficiency

RUN WITH POWER is the groundbreaking guide you need to tap the true potential of your running power meter like Stryd or RPM2. From 5K to ultramarathon, a power meter can make you faster—but only if you know how to use it. Just viewing your numbers is not enough; you can only become a faster, stronger, more efficient runner when you know what your key numbers mean for your workouts, races, and your season-long training. In Run with Power, TrainingBible coach Jim Vance offers the comprehensive guide you need to find the speed you want.

Run with Power by Jim VanceRun with Power is available now from your local bookstore, tri or running shop, and from these online retailers:
Coach Jim Vance
VeloPress
Limited offers: Get Run with Power FREE with purchase of an RPM2  or Stryd power meter while supplies last.
Amazon
Barnes & Noble
local bookstores
Chapters/Indigo